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Government of Spain reiterates its position on Gibraltar

Wednesday 11 May 2016
Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation
Archivo

​In relation with the visit by the British Foreign Secretary, Philip Hammond, to Gibraltar on Wednesday, 11 May and the meetings held there, the Government of Spain wishes to reiterate its position on the issue of Gibraltar and recall that since 1963, Gibraltar has been included on the United Nations list of "non-self-governing territories pending decolonisation".

​The colonial situation of Gibraltar is an historical anachronism in the midst of the United Nations Third International Decade for the Eradication of Colonialism (2010-2020). This colonial vestige destroys the national unity and territorial integrity of Spain and is incompatible with Resolution 1514 (XV), from 1960, on Decolonisation.

The United Nations has clearly stated that, in the process of the decolonisation of Gibraltar, the governing principle is the restitution of the Spanish territorial integrity, which is incomplete by the presence of the colony on its territory.

The question of Gibraltar must be resolved through bilateral negotiations between Spain and the United Kingdom, as the UN has been continuously recommending since 1965.

These negotiations must tackle the decolonisation of the areas ceded under Article 10 of the Treaty of Utrecht (1713), whereby solely the town and castle of Gibraltar were ceded, together with its port, fortifications and forts.

On numerous occasions, the Government of Spain has invited the United Kingdom to resume bilateral negotiations at the earliest opportunity on issues of sovereignty, which have been interrupted for so many years, without having received a response to date.

The government also recalls that on numerous occasions, it has conveyed its interest in negotiating with the United Kingdom to set up of a new ad hoc regional cooperation mechanism, based on the proposal that the United Kingdom made to Spain back in 2012. This mechanism would replace the Trilateral Forum which Spain considers to be defunct.

The new scheme would provide for the participation of the local authorities of Gibraltar, together with the local and regional Spanish authorities, that is to say, the Regional Government of Andalusia and the Municipal Association of Campo de Gibraltar, as well as Spain and the United Kingdom.